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  • RAC Benchmarks for the rest of us
    Ottawa Oracle User Group, Ottawa,         January 17, 2007
    • Abstract It is difficult to visualize what Oracle RAC can do when deployed in a small business or government department when all the benchmarks start with nodes having 64 CPU and 128 GB RAM. The promise of RAC is to be able to utilize commodity servers with modest RAM and CPU configurations. The ideal RAC node would require a single Oracle License namely, a dual-core CPU on x86 architecture using either Intel or AMD Chip. A 4-Node RAC was established and the results compared to a 4 CPU Server. The benchmark was performed using Swing Bench, a utility developed by Dominic Giles of Oracle UK and a custom script that simulated extensive write activity. The results suggest that except for very high write activity applications, RAC deployment will provide favourable performance and better management and resource allocation.

       Zip file size 615KB

  • SCM in Full Life Cycle Environment
    Oracle Development Tools User Group, Las Vegas,         June 17-21, 2002
    • Abstract Oracle Software Configuration Management (SCM) is a versatile tool. It can easily address configuration management in a standard software development life cycle, which progresses in a series of steps through analysis, design, build and implementation, with a feedback loop between each of the phases creating the prototype development environment. This paper presents the use of SCM in such an environment by considering the Analysis and the Design phases of a life cycle.

       Zip file size 232KB

  • Multi-National, Multi-Currency Data Update Dilemma
    Oracle Applications Users Group Europe, Cannes,         April 15-18,1998
    • Abstract The implementation of the multiple currency exchange rates in anything other than a single set of books leaves much to be desired from those who have to maintain the exchange rate data. Imagine having to maintain exchange rates for 30 currencies in one set of books and then having to do this 20 times over. Moreover, this data has to be maintained daily. An approach to solving this data entry nightmare is presented based on the actual implementation in a multi-org multi-national environment. The resulting module provides a single data entry point based on the local currency for the set of books used. The inverse rates to all other currencies then become available for update of the appropriate set of books.

       Zip file size 60KB

  • Information Technology Framework
    Oracle Open World, San Francisco, November 3 - 8, 1996
    Symposium on National Information Strategy, Kuwait April 30 - May 1, 1994

    • Abstract The paper presents a framework which can be used to identify and to put into perspective the Information Technology components Information, Technology and Interface and, their combinations and interactions for developing an Information Technology Strategy. The Framework addresses and evaluates the issues associated with Data, its storage and source, Information retrieval, its dependence on time frame of the business cycle and aggregation, Technology components and Interface mechanisms all of which make up the Information Technology Architecture. An example of a Decision Support System is used to show how the Information Technology Framework can be used in practice.

    Zip file size 24KB

  • Data Warehouse - Start of BPR?
    Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence ’99, Maastricht, The Netherlands, March 10-11, 1999
    Oracle CASE Special Interest Group Spring‘96 Conference, San Diego, May 15 -18, 1996

    • Abstract The need for a Data Warehouse stems from an inability to get the required information to manage the business. Usually the data is in legacy systems where there is very little data independence from the Applications. Consequently it is the Applications that have defined the business processes. The analysis to formulate the information from the existing data sources provides significant insight into the business functions being performed and the data required to provide the information. A Data Warehouse "Request for Information" thus can identify the essential business functions. This paper presents examples showing how Data Warehouse Requests suggest changes in existing Business Processes.

    Zip file size 11KB

  • Design and Implementation of a Data Warehouse
    Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence ’99, Maastricht, The Netherlands, March 10-11, 1999
    CASE Day ‘95 at International Oracle Users Week, Philadelphia, September 17-22, 1995

    • Abstract This paper will discuss the methods and approaches to address the following issues in building a Data Warehouse at Health Canada, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control.

    • Determine the scope for the information required by the various users.

    • Formulation of the data model and the transformations of the source data supplied by multiple external organizations.

    • Development of the Information Model and the building of access to various information retrieval tools like SAS, Impromptu, Oracle*Browser and SQL*Plus.

    • Performance tuning and deployment approach.

    Zip file size 10KB

  • Are Users Getting the Most from Data Models?
    BriefCASE - Journal of the Oracle CASE Special Interest Group, Summer 1995

    • Abstract This paper looks at how different ways of presenting Data Models to Users can mask incomplete analysis. The issue of Many-to-Many relationships and how it can lead to incorrect interpretation of the User Requirements is investigated using a simple example.

    Zip file size 53KB

  • Practical Uses of Oracle CASE V5.0
    International Oracle Users Week, Orlando September 26th - October 1st, 1993

  • Abstract This paper identifies the circumstances and environment necessary for success in utilizing Oracle*CASE so as to obtain the long promised productivity boost from CASE Tools. Practical examples are used to illustrate how CASE was employed in developing Forms that address multiple Surnames, Bilingual Interface and building a usable data dictionary from existing applications. Abstract This paper identifies the circumstances and environment necessary for success in utilizing Oracle*CASE so as to obtain the long promised productivity boost from CASE Tools. Practical examples are used to illustrate how CASE was employed in developing Forms that address multiple Surnames, Bilingual Interface and building a usable data dictionary from existing applications.

Zip file size 6KB

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Last modified: October 15, 2010